Salzburg
City stroll through Salzburg

Salzburg is a really beautiful city, full of history and tradition. We strolled through the city and found some places that we just loved.

Old market

A market square for trading was established in Salzburg as early as the 13th century. A dairy market, a herbal market, and a farmers market with veggies and grains were connected to the central square. For a long time, the square was not only used as a weekly market but also as a venue for festivals.

In the middle of the square is a fountain. The Florian Fountain has an octagonal basin and the column in the middle carries the wrought-iron emblem of the town. A statue of Saint Florian of Lorch stands on top of the column.
Town houses frame the market square. Amongst them is the smallest old town house of Salzburg. It is only 1.42 meters wide and was created as a small alley between buildings was closed between 1830 and 1860. The old forester's Episcopal court pharmacy opened in the 16th century.

Old market

Today, the square is home to many cafés, for example, the Café Fürst, whose founder created the famous Mozart Ball and Café Tomaselli, the oldest preserved café in Salzburg. A really nice place to drink a coffee and take in the atmosphere.

Jewish Street

Jewish Street

The Jewish Street was the centre of the Jewish settlement in medieval Salzburg. The alley is a continuation of the Getreidegasse, a street that runs from the Old Market to Waag Square. Until the expulsion of the Jews in 1498, the archbishops were frequently involved with the Jewish population through commercial and financial transactions.

Today, the Jewish Street is one of the most popular shopping streets in the city. Souvenirs can be bought and also many boutiques of famous couture shops tease you to go on a shopping spree. In the medieval vaults, you will find numerous restaurants and pubs.

A stroll through the Jewish Street in Salzburg is definitely worthwhile and should not be missed out on. Even Easter and Christmas decorations can be bought here all year round if you fancy.

Pferdeschwemme – Horse Pond

Below the Mönchsberg Cliff is the Herbert-von-Karajan-Platz. It accommodates a huge well-like structure, once set up for the horses of the city. The Pferdeshwemme, meaning the Horse Pond, served to clean and soothe the animals after a day of work. They were led into the water in the basin. On hot summer days, the pond was also used to cool the animals.

The Horse Pond in Salzburg is magnificent. It was built in 1693 and stood on the portal of the Hofmarstalls, the stable of the prince-archbishops. In 1732 it was moved to its present location. An artwork by Michael Bernhard Mandl, the “Rossbändigergruppe” – the horse taming team – can be seen in the middle of the basin.

An impressive complex! I was under the impression that the Horse Pond was just one of the many fountains in the city since I had never heard of a Horse Pond before.

Pferdeschwemme – Horse Pond

Residence Square in Salzburg

During his reign, Prince Archbishop Dietrich von Raitenau had several representative squares built all over Salzburg. The Residence Square with the baroque fountain is not only the biggest, it is also one of the most beautiful squares. Unfortunately, the prince-bishop had 55 medieval buildings demolished in order to have his ideas come to life.

The Residence Fountain is certainly one of the most beautiful fountains I have seen so far. Archbishop Guidobald Thun commissioned it. A very imaginative creation was designed. Horses, well-shaped men, dolphins and a triton, which thrusts the water vertically into the air. I don’t wish to attempt an interpretation of what the sculptor wanted to express. But when you walk around the fountain, it is simply beautiful to discover the delicate details.

Residence Square in Salzburg

Today, open-air sports and music events, such as football, concerts and Christmas markets are held on the Residence Square.

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